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The big institutes, do they support the Demotech Approach? Part 3 of 4

OECD/DAC guidelines

There is much to learn from one another, including by listening to - and heeding - the voices
of the poor themselves. Soort van "Learning from poverty"

The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) has introduced two relevant
concepts: human developmentdefined as a process that enlarges people's choices including freedom, dignity, self-respect and social status; human poverty meaning deprivation of essential capabilities such as a long and healthy life, knowledge, economic resources and community participation.

Poverty is multidimensional
Poverty encompasses different dimensions of deprivation that relate
to human capabilities including consumption and food security, health,
education, rights, voice, security, dignity and decent work. Poverty must
be reduced in the context of environmental sustainability. Reducing gender
inequality is key to all dimensions of poverty.

The dimensions of poverty cover distinct aspects of human capabilities: economic (income, livelihoods, decent work), human (health, education), political (empowerment, rights, voice), socio-cultural (status, dignity) and protective (insecurity, risk, vulnerability). Mainstreaming gender is essential for reducing poverty in all its dimensions. And sustaining the natural resource base is essential for poverty reduction to endure.

Protectionism in potential export markets as well as volatility and falling trends in the terms-of-trade are international economic causes of poverty. Debt overhang, both domestic and international, is another key catalyst. (niet helemaal pro G8 dus)

One of the 5 core dimensions of poverty:
Socio-cultural capabilities concern the ability to participate as a valued member of a community. They refer to social status, dignity and other cultural conditions for belonging to a society which are highly valued by the poor themselves. Participatory poverty assessments indicate that geographic and social isolation is the main meaning of poverty for people in many local societies; other dimensions are seen as contributing factors.